SEND ONLINE

Send documents from any device and from anywhere with the same legal validity.

Burofax

Send documents urgently and securely

Letter

Send a digital, ordinary or certified letter

Postcard

Send digital postcards online

PREPARE ITEMS TO SEND

Print out your labels and pay for your deliveries before going to the Post Office

PAQ 48

Delivery in 24/48 hours, depending on point of origin and destination

Certified Letter

Guarantee reception with a signature

Administrative Notifications

Suitable service for legal communications

WE CAN HELP

Stamp

Issue

BICENTENARIO DE LA REAL EXPEDICIÓN DE LA VACUNA DE LA VIRUELA

  • Issue date: 30/11/2004
  • Printing Process: Calcografía
  • Paper: Estucado, engomado, mate, fosforescente
  • Size of stamp: 40,9 x 28,8 mm. (horizontal)
  • Sheet effects: 50
  • Postal value of the stamps: 0,77 €
  • Print run: 1.000.000
  • Dented: 13 3/4

51120041

The bicentenary of the Royal Expedition to vaccinate against smallpox is being commemorated with the issue of a stamp that recalls this historic event, the forerunner to our modern vaccination campaigns. The philanthropic expedition that would take the smallpox vaccine to America and the Philippines sailed from La Coruna on 30 November 1803. The expedition was led by Doctor Francisco Javier de Balmis, Court Physician, and he was accompanied by Doctor José Salvany, a number of assistants, nurses, surgeons and 22 children who would serve as carriers for the virus used in the vaccine and would be continually vaccinated arm to arm during the voyage in order to keep the vaccine alive. The expedition was an altruistic attempt to alleviate human suffering and help the population of the New World combat this serious disease, which had caused massive epidemics across the continent. Smallpox had never been known in America until the Europeans arrived, and the immune systems of the local people were powerless against the disease which spread rapidly, causing devastating epidemics and decimating large sections of the indigenous population. The smallpox vaccine was discovered by the English Doctor Edward Jenner in 1796, and it was soon used in many other countries, though not without a certain amount of fear and mistrust. In Spain, Charles IV (whose daughter had suffered from the disease) encouraged inoculation, organising the Royal Expedition to Asia and America. His aim was to bring the vaccine to the people, to instruct local doctors in its handling and use, and to establish Vaccination Boards that would keep the necessary registers and keep the vaccine alive. When the expedition arrived in America, the party split into two groups to cover as much territory as possible. One, led by Balmis, went via Mexico to the Philippines, while the other, led by Salvany, crossed over into South America. The expedition was full of danger and hardship (Salvany died in Bolivia at the age of 34) but was an example great humanism and led to thousands of people being vaccinated against the disease. The World Health Organisation declared in 1980 that the disease had been officially eradicated.

Share it on your networks